Resources & Publications

  • Journal

    Annales Islamologiques, Vol. 50

    Volume 50 - 2016 of Annales islamologiques has been released on print and online. The guest-edited section is devoted to Architecture in Modern Egypt  (“Bâtir, exposer, restaurer: une histoire architecturale de l’Égypte moderne”), and features 6 essays edited by Mercedes Volait. Fully illustrated by mostly unpublished iconography, the papers explore the large variety of contexts in which architecture bloomed between the mid-19th century and the 1960s. The era witnessed the reinvention of Coptic and Islamic tradition as well as large building and land developments by corporates (e.g. Suez Canal Company), landed aristocracy (e.g. Halim and Djelal Waqf estates in Cairo) and the State (e.g. fairs and exhibitions).
     
    The Varia section of the Annual includes five articles in French, in English and in Arabic. Three of them publish sources: two Arabic papyri from the end of the 8th or the 9th century, and a paper stemming from the documents of al-Ḥaram al-Šarīf, which sheds light on the situation of Non-Muslims in Mamluk Jerusalem. The two other articles deal with the science of Hadith in the medieval period, and with musicians and singers in Ibn Iyās’ early 16th-century chronicle.

  • Archive

    The Kamil and Rifat Chadirji Photographic Archive, at the Aga Khan Documentation Center at MIT

    The Aga Khan Documentation Center at MIT (AKDC@MIT) is pleased to announce that it is now the home of the Kamil and Rifat Chadirji Photographic Archive.


    Kamil Chadirji (1897-1968), born to an influential Baghdad family, played a central role in the political life of lraq as founder and President of the National Democratic Party. His position allowed him unique opportunities to take photographs throughout Iraq. Kamil’s son, Rifat Chadirji (b. 1926), perhaps better known as one of the most influential Iraqi architects of the 20th century, was also an accomplished photographer, author, teacher, and critic (through the generosity of Rifat and Balkis Chadirji, AKDC@MITalso houses the Rifat Chadirji Architecture Archive). Together, their vast collection spans more than 5 decades and contains ca. 100,000 negatives and images documenting the Middle East, primarily Iraq.
     

    The collection illustrates daily life, cultural engagement, and social conditions in the Middle East from the 1920s – 1970s. This important record also provides a unique look at the significant transformation of Baghdad’s built environment over time.
     

    Once on loan to the Arab Image Foundation (Beirut, Lebanon), the entire collection has been given to the Aga Khan Documentation Center at MIT through a gift from the Chadirji family. In 2016, while on loan to the Arab Image Foundation and with a grant from the Graham Foundation, the photography of Rifat Chadirji, in particular, was highlighted in an exhibition entitled, Every Building in Baghdad: The Rifat Chadirji Archives at the Arab Image Foundation. Although the material now belongs to AKDC@MIT, the exhibition remains on tour and will open in Los Angeles, CA early January 2018, before returning to MIT.
     
    As with all archives given to AKDC@MIT, the collection will be catalogued, digitized, and made available to scholars, students, and research via AKDC’s research portal, Archnet, or in person at the Center. For more information, please contact akdc@mit.edu.
     

  • Book

    The Mercantile Effect: Art and Exchange in the Islamicate World during the 17th and 18th Centuries The Mercantile Effect, ed. Sussan Babaie and Melanie Gibson

    The ten essays in this volume introduce a fascinating array of subjects, each one exploring an aspect of the far-reaching ‘mercantile effect’ and its impact across western Asia in the early modern era. The authors first presented their research at the third Gingko conference held in November 2016 at the Barenboim-Said Akademie, Berlin.


    Foreword by Melanie Gibson


    Introduction by Sussan Babaie: The Mercantile Effect: On Art and Exchange in the Islamicate World  


    Suet May Lam: Fantasies of the East: ‘Shopping’ in Early Modern Eurasia 


    Amy S. Landau: The Armenian Artist Minas and Seventeenth-Century Notions of ‘Life-Likeness’ 


    William Kynan-Wilson: ‘Painted by the Turcks themselves’: Reading Peter Mundy’s Ottoman Costume Album in Context 


    Nicole Kançal-Ferrari: Golden Watches and Precious Textiles: Luxury Goods at the Crimean Khans’ Court and the Northern Black Sea Shore


    Nancy Um: Aromatics, Stimulants, and their Vessels: The Material Culture and Rites of Merchant Interaction in Eighteenth-Century Mocha


    Federica Gigante: Trading Islamic Artworks in Seventeenth-Century Italy: the Case of the Cospi Museum


    Anna Ballian: From Genoa to Constantinople: The Silk Industry of Chios


    Christos Merantzas: Ottoman Textiles Within an Ecclesiastical Context: Cultural Osmoses in Mainland Greece


    Francesco Gusella: Behind the Practice of Partnership: Seventeenth Century Portuguese Devotional Ivories of West India.


    Gül Kale: Visual and Embodied Memory of an Ottoman Architect: Travelling on Campaign, Pilgrimage and Trade Routes in the Middle East

  • Book

    Persian Art: Image-Making in Eurasia

    Persian Art: Image-Making in Eurasia

    Edited by Yuka Kadoi
    Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2018.
    183 pages, incl. 59 illustration
     
    In this illustrated book, nine contributors explore multifaceted aspects of art, architecture and material culture of the Persian cultural realm, encompassing West Asia, Anatolia, Central Asia, South Asia, East Asia and Europe. Each chapter examines the historical, religious or scientific role of visual culture in the shaping, influencing and transforming of distinctive ‘Persian’ aesthetics across the various historical periods, ranging from pre-Islamic, medieval and early modern Islamic to modern times.
     
    1. The Visual Culture of Greater Iran: Some Examples of Kushano-Sasanian Art
    Judith A. Lerner
     
    2. The Late Sasanian Figurative Capitals at Taq-i Bustan: Proposals Regarding Identification and Origins
    Matteo Compareti
     
    3. Architecture of the Wider Persian World: From Central Asia to Western Anatolia in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries
    Richard Piran McClary
     
    4. From Acquisition to Display: The Reception of Chinese Ceramics in the Pre-modern Persian World
    Yuka Kadoi
     
    5.  Devotion and Protection: Four Amuletic Scrolls from Safavid Persia
    Tobias Nünlist
     
    6. The Minarets of Hurmuzgan
    Iván Szántó
     
    7. Persia, India or Indo-Persian? The Study of Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-century Knotted Pile Carpets  
    Raquel Santos
     
    8. The Calligraphic Art of Mishkin Qalam
    Francesco Stermotich-Cappellari
     
    9. The Kashan Mihrab in Berlin: A Historiography of Persian Lustreware
    Markus Ritter

    ISBN: 9781474411158

  • Book

    The Aghlabids and their Neighbors Art and Material Culture in Ninth-Century North Africa, eds Glaire D. Anderson, Corisande Fenwick, and Mariam Rosser-Owen

    The first dynasty to mint gold dinars outside of the Abbasid heartlands, the Aghlabid (r. 800-909) reign in North Africa has largely been neglected in the scholarship of recent decades, despite the canonical status of its monuments and artworks in early Islamic art history. The Aghlabids and their Neighbors focuses new attention on this key dynasty. The essays in this volume, produced by an international group of specialists in history, art and architectural history, archaeology, and numismatics, illuminate the Aghlabid dynasty’s interactions with neighbors in the western Mediterranean and its rivals and allies elsewhere, providing a state of the question on early medieval North Africa and revealing the centrality of the dynasty and the region to global economic and political networks.

  • Book

    Living the Good Life: Consumption in the Qing and Ottoman Empires of the Eighteenth Century, ed. Suraiya Faroqhi and Elif Akçetin

    Eighteenth-century consumers of the Qing and Ottoman empires had access to an increasingly diverse array of goods, from home furnishings to fashionable clothes and new foodstuffs. While this tendency was of shorter duration and intensity in the Ottoman world, some urbanites of the sultans’ realm did enjoy silks, coffee, and Chinese porcelain. By contrast, a vibrant consumer culture flourished in Qing China, where many consumers flaunted their fur coats and indulged in gourmet dining.


    Living the Good Life explores how goods furthered the expansion of social networks, alliance-building between rulers and regional elites, and the expression of elite, urban, and gender identities. The scholarship in the present volume highlights the recently emerging “material turn” in Qing and Ottoman historiographies and provides a framework for future research.

  • Book

    Mattia Guidetti, In the Shadow of the Church: The Building of Mosques in Early Medieval Syria

    In his book In the Shadow of the Church: The Building of Mosques in Early Medieval Syria, Mattia Guidetti examines the establishment of Muslim religious architecture within the Christian context in which it first appeared in the Syrian region, contributing to the debate on the transformation of late antique society to a Muslim one. He scrutinizes the slow process of conversion to Islam of the most important town centers by looking at religious places of both communities between the seventh and the eleventh century. The author assesses the relevancy of churches by analyzing the location of mosques and by researching phenomena of transfer of marble material from churches to mosques.


    Winner of the 2017 Syrian Studies Association Prize for Outstanding Book on Syria.

  • Book

    Arts of the East: Highlights of Islamic Art from the Bruschettini Collection

    From lavish textiles and intricately patterned carpets to colourful paintings, polychrome Iznik wares, and precious inlaid metalwork, Arts of the East: Highlights of Islamic Art from the Bruschettini Collection introduces readers to a selection from one of the world’s most important private collections of Islamic art.
     
    Showcased in this catalogue are more than 40 works of art, dating from the 13th to 17th centuries, whose origins span the Islamic world from Spain to China and demonstrate remarkable vibrancy, variety, and technical perfection. The importance of cross-cultural relationships, the transformation of local styles, the fascination of luxury goods — the stories these objects carry awaken curiosity as well as awe.
     
    Included in the catalogue are a foreword from Alessandro Bruschettini on the origin of the collection, essays from Curator Filiz Çakır Phillip on metalwork, ceramics, and textiles, plus contributions from internationally renowned scholar Claus-Peter Haase on the art of the book and well-known expert Michael Franses on the art of the carpet.

  • Website

    Bernard O'Kane, The Monumental Inscriptions of Historic Cairo Database​

    The 3271 inscriptions from 509 monuments, 3395 bibliographic references from 63 bibliographic items, 12,107 photographs and 1425 drawings are now searchable in English and Arabic (the latter for the Arabic text field only).


  • Book

    Jere Bacharach, Islamic History Through Coins, Second Edition

    Jere L. Bacharach, Islamic History through Coins: An Analysis and Catalogue of Tenth-Century Ikhshidid Coinage", 2nd ed. (Cairo: AUC Press, 2015).



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